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Glazed Carrots and Parsnips

23 January

The parsnip is closely related to carrots and celeriac, and has been utilized as food for thousands of years. The parsnip has a unique, sweet-earthy flavor like that of no other vegetable, and it also has an interesting nutrition profile, being especially high in potassium, folic acid, and vitamin C. While you may need to parboil parsnips in order to use them in some other way (for example, in a mash or baked in a gratin) boiling generally isn’t the beat treatment for them, as they become waterlogged and unpalatable.

To steam parsnips, place peeled 2-inch rounds of parsnip in a steamer basket over boiling water. Cover and cook until tender, about 10 minutes or less. To roast them, half them lengthwise then place in a large roasting pan in a single layer and drizzle liberally with olive oil, tossing to coat. Cook in a 400 degree oven for 30 – 40 minutes, depending on size or until tender and golden brow. Toughness of a parsnip is due to storing them too long. Parsnips will keep, refrigerated, in loosely sealed bag for up to 1 week.

¼ cup butter
4 large carrots, cut into 3-inch by ½-inch pieces
4 large parsnips, cut into 3 inch by ½-inch pieces
¾ cup orange juice
¾ chicken or vegetable stock
2 tablespoons lemon juice
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
3 tablespoons chopped chives (if you don’t have chives you can use green onions, chopping the green part finely)


  1. Melt butter in a large skillet over medium heat.
  2. Cook and stir carrots and parsnips in melted butter until lightly browned on edges, up to 8 – 10 minutes.
  3.  Stir in orange juice, stock, lemon juice, sea salt and pepper onto the carrots and parsnips. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low and cover. Simmer until liquid reduces to a syrup, about 10 minutes. Stir often.
  4. Season with more salt and pepper, if needed; sprinkle with chives or green onions.

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